Mercury Retrograde in Scorpio Vol. 1

Ceremony and Ritual

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he Lay of the Land, er, Underworld retrograde

Miracles,

Today kicks off a short volume of writings on Mercury’s upcoming retrograde into the sign of Scorpio – which begins on October 31st. You can also find these writings at Canto and on my Facebook page where you may comment or ask a question if the spirit moves you!

Mercury’s retrograde into Scorpio is truly a descent into the Underworld of Shadow and Secrets. This retrograde period has the ability to powerfully shift our perceptions and bring about deep healing – especially to old wounds and traumas, but it also comes with a fair amount of drama and traps that we can easily fall into if we are not helpful.

Here are some of the highlights that you will want to be aware of during this retrograde period.

Those of you who have Scorpio as your sun, moon, or ascendant should be particularly careful during this rx period as you will most likely feel very affected by it. Those with Pluto or Mars as ruling planets or those with loaded 8th houses should also take special note of the retrograde and make plans now to work proactively with it.

The first thing to note is that Mercury retrograde in Scorpio is similar to Mercury retrograde in Pisces in that these are both water signs and therefore our feelings, emotions, and instincts are much closer to the surface than usual.

For those accustomed to working from a place of deep feeling, this will feel normal but for those who are not, this can feel precarious and you may find yourself saying and doing things that usually you would keep to yourself.

Of all the water signs Scorpio has the most passion so during this rx period strong passions may be stirred up within yourself and definitely within those around you – proceed with caution. It is not uncommon during Mercury retrograde in Scorpio to see someone leaning heavily into their most passionate conviction only to discard it as soon as the retrograde period is over.

In classical astrology Scorpio was ruled by Mars and only later did Pluto come into the picture. As a Mars-ruled sign, Scorpio, like Aries, can be aggressive, protective, and combative. (It can also be disciplined, just, and heroic).

These lesser tendencies of aggression, over-protection, and combativeness can be on full display during the retrograde period and they show up in behavior but especially in speech.

It is really easy for everyone to take on a harsher and less kind edge in their speech and voices during Mercury rx in Scorpio. On the flip side, it is a wonderful time to write about anything deep, thought-provoking, or fantastic.

The third aspect of this retrograde deals with money. Scorpio is the ruler of “other people’s money and resources” so while this sign does not correlate directly to your day in and day out income (that would be Taurus) it does speak to investments, borrowing, lending, and working with money.

Stocks and many financial instruments are Scorpio in nature so you will want to keep an eye on your cash, and especially watch your investments. Typically Mercury rx is a bad time to make a new big investment or go in with partners on some financial scheme (no matter how sound it looks). Better to wait until the retrograde is complete (or has not yet started) to buy, sell, trade, or transfer any significant aspects.

This is also a time when each individual will be rewarded if they pause and take a long look at where they are investing their own resources – think about money but also beyond money – and determine whether those investment choices are still sound.

Finally, Mercury retrograde in Scorpio can speak to plumbing issues both in your body and in your home. Scorpio rules the bowels of the body (as well as our sex organs) and the bowels of the home as well.

Plumbing issues are likely to emerge at this time so if you know you have something upcoming then getting a start on it before the rx period is a good idea. At the very least make sure you have a good plumber on speed dial.

When it comes to our physical bodies, Mercury rx is always a good time to go in to see your medical provider and get an opinion or a second opinion on a situation. It can encourage revised or meticulously reviewed opinions and treatment plans. If you are having any tummy troubles this is the best time all year to have those looked at carefully by a doctor that you trust and the same goes for any issues with your sex organs and/or intimacy issues.

Arching over these specific points is the fact that Mercury retrograde in Scorpio is a powerful time spiritually for all of us. This is the sign of Life, Death, and Resurrection and as such it is a time when we may consciously choose what needs to die, what needs to be aided and supported in coming back to life, and what needs to be born.

Considering your spiritual affiliations, congregations, and practices at this time is a powerful thing to do that will yield much fruit. Making magic and engaging in any Sacred Arts practices is especially auspicious now and you can learn much from any endeavors you make in that arena.

This is one of the deepest retrogrades, so make good use of it!

xo,
Bri

magic, miracles: receive my lunar letters

ARRIVING on full moons each month.

What Football Taught Me About Magic

Alchemy and Magic

M

iracles,

You’d never know it was early September here in San Antonio. Every so often we get a thrilling hint of the big change coming, but most days the 100 degree temperatures will throw us off track. I was sitting at the edge of the sandy pitch of a field watching a football game the other week while the sun pounded down on top of me, wondering, how did this happen…? What wrong turn did I take?

It wasn’t just the heat. I was in this field, in the sun, to watch my son play football. This was not something I could ever have seen coming. Growing up in Texas there were a few things I made it my business to avoid: pushy Bible-thumpers, getting married too young, irresponsible gun owners, sport hunters, and…football.

Although there was a very brief period where I waved pom-poms and shouted cheers on the sideline of football fields, and the time I sang the national anthem to open up a state championship game, I did not like the sport. From my viewpoint, it was the source of never-ending budget woes for the fine art departments all across the state. Football was always the reason we couldn’t afford new costumes or light gels or sound systems for theatrical and choral events. But even more, I bought into the notion that all football players were dumb jocks and chose to ignore or overlook the fact that there were quite a few of them in my honors and advanced placement classes. Football was huge at my rural high school. It was everything to many people, life itself, and I wanted no part of it. I didn’t like it and so I paid zero attention to it.

After high school, I went to a very small liberal arts college tucked away in the mountains. The college did not have a football field, much less an athletic team. (We did, however, have “Spartan Mad Ball”, but that is a story for another day.) So I never really thought much about the game after the age of 18. I would watch the Super Bowl with my family for the commercials and I cheered when the New Orleans Saints won one year and when the Eagles won a couple of years back because I like come-from-behind victory stories of any stripe. But generally speaking, football was not a part of my life in any significant way.

Our oldest child is a gifted visual artist and musician. He likes playing basketball and soccer, and so I never really had cause to think about his relationship to football other than to look at the data around concussions and decide unilaterally that he would never play full contact unless the game radically changed.

Then, last spring, talk of flag football came up. Then again, in summer when registration opened. I found myself in both cases writing my son’s name on the lines of various lists, and it was like the experiences you hear people report when they die – of seeing themselves from a far off distance…it was like that, disembodied.

Before I knew it, a team had been formed and my son came home and told me he was playing “center”. My husband told me that our son would be responsible for “snapping” the ball. He said this as if it were perfectly obvious what all of those words meant. And all I could think was “damn, damn, damn, damn…I have no idea what is happening!!!”

If you know any kids, you know that every now and then they talk about stuff with this air of confidence and you maybe know .05% of what they are talking about. But you still know .05%. In this case, I knew precisely 0%. This was a first for me. So I woke up early as I do, worked on the upcoming book, and then found myself in the unfamiliar world of ESPN. And friends, it is a WORLD.

I learned the basics about flag football, the names of the positions for starters, and delved into the craziness of different plays. I discovered that many of the best college players are also outstanding academically and that some of the greatest pro players of all time were also dancers. I saw lots of articles on the various problems and hypocrisies of the NFL and of pro sports in general, but I also saw community outreach and the ways that these organizations are trying to do better. I was humbled by how much I didn’t know, and by how many wrong things I had assumed. I talked to a mom friend of mine who is sports savvy and I confessed my ignorance and new-found knowledge to her while she benevolently chuckled.

Now I am not sure that I could call myself a fan of football. In fact, I am pretty sure I can’t call myself that. And I have no clue if my child will play after this season or if his little brother will want to play at all. But none of those things are the point of this story. This is not about how I came to love football. Rather, this is about how I thought I knew something for sure – about an activity, the people who do it and the people who enjoy it – and how I crashed, face-first into how wrong those assumptions were. It was painful, what they call a “growth” experience, but it was also direct teaching about magic.

Think on it. Take whatever situation you would like to magically charm this way or that and ask yourself what assumptions underpinning your intentions you are carrying about the situation, about the people involved, about the external conditions, and most of all about your relationship to those things. What if your assumptions are off by just a little? What if they are dead wrong? What if there is a lot more territory to roam and explore within the situation than you originally were able to see? How does that change your magic? How does that change you?

You know if you’ve read my book “Making Magic”, that I never give a “definition” of magic. In my view and experience, no such thing is possible, because magic is radically particular to each person and each situation.

But we can describe some conditions for magic, and this is one of them, the moment when one of your most cherished beliefs is given a vigorous shaking by some experience.

Magic happens in the space these questions create. the changes that could flow from them, and our ability to follow them out where ever they may lead. It happens in the completely unexpected, un-looked for, and least likely places…like a hot football field in South Central Texas.

So, I’ll continue to sit there in the 100 degree heat watching a game that challenges all of my assumptions, because I want to see where all of this leads not only with my child but with my relationships and with my life as a whole. What friendships will be created, fostered (or even dissolved)? What new insights will this experience afford all of us? What magic will be made?

We are celebrating a Full Moon in Pisces today, and Pisces loves challenging assumptions. Let yourself celebrate by paying close attention to your dreams and taking a magical sacred bath.

xo,
Bri

magic, miracles: receive my lunar letters

ARRIVING on full moons each month.

Prayer for the Solar Eclipse

Lunar Letter

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ay we shine.

And as we shine, we know that we journey, one foot in front of the other, carving out the regular cycle of our stories, the circular motion of cell and breath and life, and that during this journey there will be interruptions.

We trip and we fall as we wander our course, sure as the Sun and Moon also trip over themselves in their giddy rush to meet one another once more, falling into each other’s limned embrace.

And as we rise up with our skinned knees and elbows we might, if we are brave, we might, if we are something close to wise, say “thank you” – hearing within the interruption a call to attention and awareness, discovering grace in the fall.

Seeing too the patterns to which we have clung and agreed and perpetuated knowingly or not, and taking the moment of rising to decide if we still wish to walk in this particular way on this particular path, knowing that the choice resides within, as does the answer.

And as we choose, righting ourselves once more, traveling our path with greater purpose, we no longer fear the falling, the missing of the mark, or the wandering off the course and into the wild and star-filled woods. Rather, we welcome the moments of panic and loss, recalling the freedoms that they hold alongside our own true commitments, knowing that they bring us ever closer to the embrace of our own deepest Beloved.

And so, burnished by shadow and bruised by our falling, we shine ever brighter.

Image credit: The above image comes from the book Sun and Moon, which I first heard about from the fabulous Arts and Culture blog, Brainpickings. Sun and Moon is published by indie publisher Tara Books, dedicated to giving voice to marginalized art and literature, and featuring the work of ten Indian folk and tribal artists illustrating ancient stories about Sun and Moon.

magic, miracles: receive my lunar letters

ARRIVING on full moons each month.

What the Goat Knows

Lunar Letter

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ear Miracles,

Earlier this week I was perusing Terri’s wonderful blog and came across a recent post on the folklore of goats. Ever since visiting our local zoo when I was a little girl and finding one goat in particular who loved eating my ponytail, I have been a fan. I was especially taken with one fact that her article presented: goats are one of the earliest animals domesticated by humans but they are also happy to return to a feral state whenever an opportunity presents itself.

Tomorrow the New Moon in Capricorn, a sign traditionally represented by the goat, arcs across the heavens and the sun returns for another year of shining light. In our Sacred Arts community, much is made of the ideas of “being wild”, “going wild”, “embracing the wild”. I don’t think it is too much to say that many of us find our ethics defined, honed, and in debt to all that is wild. And as we know from mythos, the goat, often is emblematic of all that is wild, natural, sensual, and feral, but I think more than that, the goat is a great lover of paradox.

When we turn to classical Western astrology to understand the goat-marked sign of Capricorn much of what we discover does not, at first blush, speak to the wild. Capricorn is a sign that is often attributed leadership skills, it is affiliated with the 10th house which is the house of career and prosperity building. Discipline, seriousness, steadfastness, and incredible endurance are the most common qualities associated with this cardinal earth sign. Interestingly, those same qualities are often the very ones that farmers and ranchers look for in various domesticated breeds they raise.

What does it mean that the stellar constellation most affiliated with the goat is one that seems to find a definition against the common perception of what the goat represents in art, culture, and religion? Could it mean that domestic and wild are in a more complicated relationship than we commonly think? Is this what the goat knows?

To be domesticated is not a bad thing. To be domestic is to be of the home, a complicated world in itself that forms the basis of all economies and all political systems (the word econoimos in Ancient Greek literally means home). Domesticated is not synonymous with being tame, and in fact, if you speak to farmers and ranchers who actually know and appreciate their craft, they will drive this home again and again — no animal is truly tame, ever. So it is with us. We are not ever tame, never wholly domesticated, we are always capable of spontaneity and surprise, always. Most importantly, domestication assumes wildness; quite simply domestication cannot happen anywhere except where something, someone, is wild.

I have found that we feel, keenly and deeply, loss when we speak about wild places, even those of us who are the most urban city slickers dream better at night knowing that there are places where it is truly dark, and quiet, and alive. And we forget, so easily and so frequently that what is wild is not only outside and away from us, locked away in a national park or held aloof and apart in a refuge. What is wild lives within us, underneath the skin, between each heartbeat and rush of blood?

The goat reminds us not to forget, never to forget, that we can slip the collar, break the fence, run the field and then return…to what is known and loved and domestic in the best possible way. On this point there is no choice to make; we carry both the wild and domestic within us.

Tonight as you sit in the darkness of the New Moon ask yourself this:

  • Where am I wild?
  • Where am I domestic?
  • What does the right relationship with both look like?
The picture in this post is part of a series of goat and sheep portraits shot by Kevin Horan. A wonderful article with many more pictures may be found here: http://huff.to/1zO4RXJ

magic, miracles: receive my lunar letters

ARRIVING on full moons each month.